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Todd E Golde

Todd E Golde is affiliated with the University of Florida.[1]He specializes in neuroscience.[2]

An investigator into the study of Alzheimer’s disease for almost three decades, Golde has published more than 220 papers that have been cited more than 25,000 times.[3]He has expanded his leading-edge research to include other neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and even malaria.[3]Nationally, he is a member of the medical and scientific advisory board for the Alzheimer’s Association and the BrightFocus Foundation.[3]

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the University of Florida

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Medical News Today: Study sheds light on how stress may raise risk of Alzheimer's

Researchers say stress triggers the release of a hormone that boosts production of a protein in the brain that is involved in the development of Alzheimer's. In a study published in The EMBO Journal, Dr. Todd Golde, director of the Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative Disease at the University of Florida, and colleagues describe how a hormone released by the brain in response to stress increases production of a protein associated with Alzheimer's development. Based on their findings, the team is now investigating a novel Alzheimer's prevention strategy: the use of an antibody that blocks the release of this stress hormone, inhibiting the production of the Alzheimer's-related protein. For their study, Dr. Golde and colleagues set out to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms that link stress and Alzheimer's by analyzing the brains of mice that had been subject to acute stress, comparing them with the brains of non-stressed mice.[4]

2015-09-19

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