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Sharon Nachman

Dr. Nachman is an international leader in the area of pediatric infectious disease, and the chief of Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and director of the Office of Clinical Trials for Stony Brook Medicine.[1]Nachman is co-author of a newly published paper in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases that calls for the start of clinical trials with children. Nachman discourages allowing older kids to trick-or-treat unsupervised.[2]With over 25 years in practice, Nachman has seen several cases of children who have contracted Vibrio.[3]

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Recent events

THE NEW NORMAL: Dr. Nachman answers viewers' questions about vaccines, number of COVID-19 cases

Dr. Nachman talks about how the states play a role in the distribution plan.[1]

12/01/2020

Event Date

CDC Issues COVID Guide for Trick-or-Treating

A costume mask is NOT considered a substitute for a cloth mask. However, costume masks should not be worn over cloth masks if it makes it difficult to breathe. Although the CDC considers parties that take place outdoors where social distancing is maintained and masks are worn to be a moderate-risk activity. The other is a trick-or-treat search/scavenger hunt with household members in or around your home.[2]

09/23/2020

Event Date

What to Watch Out For with Flesh-Eating Bacteria

Smaller cuts aren’t as much of a likely entry point for these bacteria, but open wounds such as skinned knees or elbows are, said Dr. Sharon Nachman, chief of Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital. Those residents with open wounds who have swum in salty or brackish water can lower the risk of infection by washing their wounds with soap and freshwater soon after coming out of the water. Some other pathogens in the water also can look as bad as Vibrio, but they need different antibiotics, which include Aeromonas.[3]

09/25/2020

Event Date