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David L Strayer

David L Strayer is a neuroscientist at the University of Utah.[12]He specializes in psychology.[34]

In a comparison of ten different voice-activated systems, Strayer found the most distracting to be the Mazda 6 system, followed by Microsoft’s Cortana.[5]From research conducted since 2015, he ranked driving activities on a 5-point scale, with 5 indicating the highest risk.[6]

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David L Strayer on Wikipedia

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the University of Utah

Employer

  • 2

    Events

  • 380

    Mentions

  • 26

    Docs

Events

It takes 27 seconds to regain focus after talking to Siri

The found that a driver travelling 25 mph continues to be distracted for up to 27 seconds after disconnecting from most phone and car voice-command systems. 'Impaired Attention' "Most people think, 'I hang up and I'm good to go,'" said David Strayer, senior author of the two new studies. "Just because these systems are in the car doesn't mean it's a good idea to use them while you are driving," said Strayer.[7]

2015-10-22

Event Date

Univ. of Utah study finds many infotainment systems too distracting to be used when vehicle in motion

Many of the infotainment features in most 2017 vehicles are so distracting they should not be enabled while a vehicle is in motion, according to a new study by University of Utah researchers. The study, led by University of Utah Psychology Professor David L. Strayer, found In-Vehicle Information Systems take drivers’ attention off the road for too long to be safe. The study, conducted the study for the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, reviewed infotainment systems in 30 different 2017 vehicles. In the new study, programming navigation was the most distracting task—taking drivers on average 40 seconds to complete.[8]

2017-10-05

Event Date

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