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Cleavon Gilman

Cleavon Gilman is an Emergency Medicine physician in Arizona.[1]While serving in Iraq as member of the Shock Stabilization Team for Alpha Surgical Company, Dr. Gilman also provided medical coverage to an Explosive Ordnance Disposal team and civilian Iraqis.[2]Dr. Gilman graduated from the University of California at San Francisco School of Medicine in June 2016.[3]Gilman is a doctor of emergency medicine in New York City, where more than 29,500 people have been hospitalized with COVID-19 so far.[4]Gilman is also a musician who raps about physician wellness , health policy, and evidence-based medicine, a fiance to his partner of 16 years, and an uncle to 10- and 12-year-old girls whom he raises like daughters.'[5]Since the spring, Gilman has become a social media tour de force.[6]

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Recent events

IN MY ORBIT: Dr. Cleavon Gilman Auditions as the New Dr. Fauci

According to his bio, Dr. Gilman has been on the front lines of COVID-19 in New York City since March, and decided to document his experiences in a “ Covid Diary “. Dr. Gilman ranted about the lack of available COVID ICU Beds, and about Governor Ducey’s handling of the COVID pandemic in general. Had Dr. Gilman been looking at the November 22 numbers of ICU beds available for COVID dedicated patients, he would have seen that only 27 percent of the COVID-designated ICU beds were in use. From Dr. Gilman’s thread,[1]

11/30/2020

Event Date

The COVID-19 War Diaries

“When a patient passes away or expires, we have to report the death to the medical examiner’s office,” Dr. Gilman says. “If a patient is about to pass away, on comfort care or palliative care, typically we try to get that patient out of the emergency room.” Patients are wheeled to a more private room. Dr. Gilman now has three days off to rest and recover. Dr. Gilman continued to check up on the woman’s father throughout his shift, as he tries to do with everyone, no matter who comes through the doors.[2]

04/14/2020

Event Date