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Adrian J. Luckman

Adrian J. Luckman is a glaciologist at Swansea University.[12]

Luckman is a scientist with Swansea University located in Wales, UK.[4]Dr. Luckman has been working on the MIDAS project, a UK-based Antarctic research project, investigating the effects of a warming climate on the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica.[5]“The rift tip appears also to have turned significantly towards the ice front, indicating that the time of calving is probably very close,” Luckman and O’Leary wrote in a blog post for the Melt on Ice Shelf Dynamics and Stability project.[6]

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Adrian J. Luckman on Wikipedia

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Swansea University

Employer

  • 4

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  • 948

    Mentions

  • 37

    Docs

Events

Iceberg the size of Delaware to break off from Antarctica

“When it calves, the Larsen C Ice Shelf will lose more than 10% of its area to leave the ice front at its most retreated position ever recorded; this event will fundamentally change the landscape of the Antarctic Peninsula,” lead researcher Professor Adrian Luckman said in a statement posted to the MIDAS website. Martin O’Leary, a researcher at MIDAS, told CNN the huge iceberg could render the remaining sheet of ice unstable — causing sea levels to rise and to overall changes to the Antarctic’s landscape.[7]

2017-01-06

Event Date

New crack found in one of Antarctica’s largest ice shelves

New Delhi: Latest satellite observations reveal the rift in the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica now has a second branch. The new branch of the rift is 15 km long. Professor Adrian Luckman of Swansea University College of Science, head of Project Midas, described the latest findings: "While the previous rift tip has not advanced, a new branch of the rift has been initiated. If either branch makes it to Larsen C’s edge, the shelf could calve off a 5,000-square-kilometer hunk of ice, creating one of the largest icebergs ever recorded, says glaciologist Adrian Luckman of Swansea University in Wales.[9]

2017-05-03

Event Date

Massive crack in Antarctica ice shelf grows 11 miles in 6 days – 8 miles remain before Delaware-sized iceberg calves – “It wi

Adrian Luckman of Project MIDAS, a British Antarctic research project that’s keeping watch on the ever-growing crack, said it’s the largest jump since January. In the largest jump since January, the rift in the Larsen C Ice Shelf has grown an additional 17 km between May 25 and May 31 2017. This has moved the rift tip to within 13 km of breaking all the way through to the ice front, producing one of the largest ever recorded icebergs. When it calves, the Larsen C Ice Shelf will lose more than 10% of its area to leave the ice front at its most retreated position ever recorded; this event will fundamentally change the landscape of the Antarctic Peninsula.[10]

2017-06-02

Event Date

The Larsen C Iceberg Finally Broke Away. Now There’s a Trillion-Ton Iceberg Adrift

The growing rift that carved across one of the Antarctica Peninsula’s largest ice shelves reached its end, sending a 2,240-square mile iceberg spiraling into the sea. The ice shelf was the fourth-largest ice shelf in the world, but following the calving event that cleaved off more than 12 percent of its area, it has been knocked down to fifth in the rankings. Adrian Luckman, a scientist who has been watching the iceberg for years with Project MIDAS, said it would take months or years to document the health of the remaining ice shelf. If that happens, it could mean more big calving events, putting further stress on the remaining ice. They’ll also be looking at the surface of the ice sheet for melt ponds, a process that’s already weakening ice shelves in other other parts of Antarctica.[8]

2017-07-13

Event Date

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